Episode 62: Flesh and Blood

In this episode we explore two aspects of the term ‘flesh and blood.’ We examine the human body from the perspective of theĀ Anglo-Saxons by looking at their words for parts of the body. We also explore Old English words associated with sickness and disease. At the same time, we consider how the term ‘flesh and blood’ is utilized to describe one’s children or other very close relatives. Specifically, we examine the mothers who fought to secure the English throne for their respective flesh and blood following the death of King Cnut in 1035.

4 thoughts on “Episode 62: Flesh and Blood

  1. Hello! I stumbled on your podcast while I was doing research for a class I’m taking on the History of the English language. Your insights have added a lot to what I’m already learning. Thank you so much. But, I have a question: on podcast 62, you mention a PIE root-word with the meaning “to expand or increase.” It sounds as if you are pronouncing it with a b, but I can’t make out the word. Would you mind telling me what the word is so that I can do more research on it for myself? Thank you!

  2. Hi Kevin –
    Thoroughly enjoying your podcast !! Just finished episode 62; BUT !!! what happened to the agreement Hartha Canute has with Magnus, King of Norway ?
    Karen

    • Keep listening. That agreement is discussed briefly in the next episode, but it played a crucial role in the events of the year 1066 (covered in Episode 67). It effectively gave the Norwegian king a claim to the English throne which was asserted in 1066. The last Anglo-Saxon king (Harold) had to deal with an invasion by the Norwegian king in the north of England at almost the exact same time that William the Conqueror was invading the south. Those back-to-back invasions sealed the fate of the Anglo-Saxons – and allowed the Normans to complete their conquest.

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