Episode 54: Pronoun Pros and Cons

The Modern English pronouns were largely inherited from the Anglo-Saxons.  While many of them have survived in tact, others have changed a quite a bit over the centuries. Some disappeared, some new ones were created, and some were even borrowed from the Vikings. This time we explore the history of the English personal pronouns. We also examine the historical roots of the modern confusion surrounding the proper use of English personal pronouns.

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Episode 53: The End of Endings

In the 10th century, several factors came together in northern England which resulted in the loss of Old English inflectional endings. This was a fundamental change to English grammar which simplified word forms and led to a fixed a word order. We conclude this episode by examining the plural word forms used in Modern English, and examining how those plural forms evolved in the context of inflectional loss.

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Episode 52: Bloody Axes and a Battle Royal

In the mid-900s, the English king battled a grand alliance of Celtic and Viking leaders at a place called Brunanburh.  The result was an Anglo-Saxon victory, and one of the more important poems composed during the Old English period. But the Anglo-Saxon victory did little to secure the region around York. The Viking influence remained strong there, and control of York passed between the English and the Vikings. One consequence of that prominent Viking presence was the continuing flow of Norse words into the northern English dialects. We continue to explore the influence of Scandinavian vocabulary on Modern English.

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Episode 51: Norse Words and a New English

During the 10th century,  the English language spoken in northern and eastern England began to change under the influence of Old Norse.  These changes resulted in a north-south linguistic divide which still exists today.  In this episode we examine how modern linguists use sound changes to identify Norse words in Modern English.  We also examine English-Norse synonyms derived from common Germanic root words.

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Episode 50: A Unified Family of English Speakers

In the early 10th century, King Alfred’s children and grandchildren conquered the Viking region known as the Danelaw. This brought all of the Anglo-Saxon kingdoms under the rule of a single monarch. That monarch was Aethelstan who became the first King of England.  The conquest of the Danelaw was also a family affair. So we explore the etymology of Modern English words related to family and family relations.

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Episode 49: Vikings Among the English and French

Following the death of Alfred, there was a decade of relative peace between the Anglo-Saxons and the Danes.  During this period, Scandinavian settlers continued to migrate to the Danelaw.  In this episode, we explore the early Scandinavian influence on English in the Danelaw.  We also examine the continuing Viking raids in France, and the founding of Normandy in the year 911.

Map Prepared by Louis Henwood

Map Prepared by Louis Henwood

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Episode 48: The Unity of Alfred’s English

After defeating the Danes, King Alfred set about reforming the educational system of Wessex. His reforms promoted English to an unprecedented level.  His reforms required the translation of many texts from Latin to English, and Alfred himself assisted with those translations. He also issued a new legal code and initiated the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.  One of Alfred’s goals was the unification of the Anglo-Saxon people under Wessex leadership, so we explore the history of English words related to unity.

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Episode 47: The Man Who Saved English

King Alfred is the only English monarch to be known as “the Great.” His struggles and ultimate victory over the Danes ensured the survival of the Anglo-Saxon culture and the English language.  In this episode, we explore the life of King Alfred and the historical events which led to the defeat of the Danes in Wessex.  We also explore the history of certain words related to topography.

Map Prepared by Louis Henwood

Map Prepared by Louis Henwood

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Episode 46: Cynewulf and the Kindred Kings

In this episode, we look at the English terms associated with kings and nobility and explore the concept of Anglo-Saxon kingship. We also look at the poetry of the 9th century poet Cynewulf.  The link between kings and Cynewulf is a shared root word which gave us the modern word ‘kin.’  Lastly, we examine the initial phases of Viking raids in Francia and Britain.

Map Prepared by Louis Henwood

Map Prepared by Louis Henwood

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